Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> M_nus (CAN)
eYe-reEs
post Dec 7 2007, 18:04
Post #1


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



what's new?

05Dec Barem - Never Better Then Late EP (MINUS59)



Artist : Barem
title : Never Better Than Late
Label: M-nus

Rls Date: 10/12/2007
Cat. N°: 5
Genre: Deep Minimal


Tracklist :
01 - Barem - Censored Elephant
02 - Barem - Then They…
03 - Barem - Ponymal Morning
04 - Barem - So Serial
05 - Barem - Ears

http://m-nus.com
http://www.minimalfreaks.com
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Dec 7 2007, 18:12
Post #2


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Plastikman - Nostalgik.3



Label: M_nus
Catalogue No.: minus(-3)
Distribution: MDM / Neuton / Beatport / M-nus.com
Vinyl Release Date: 30 Nov 2007

Tracklist:
A Plastikman - Spastik (Dubfire Rework)
B Plastikman - Panikattack (Guido Schneider Second Attack Remix)

http://www.plastikman.com/
http://m-nus.com
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Dec 7 2007, 18:16
Post #3


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



EXPANSION | contraction USB Edition



One constant exploration found throughout the music released on MINUS is the relationship between Sound and Silence.

Recently we reported about the latest release EXPANSION | contraction which was and will be released in various formats - as cd, vinyl, digital download!

On december the 3rd a limited USB stick will be released which contains the following tracks:

1. Plastikman-Risk Assessment
2. Heartthrob- Roundabout
3. Dubfire- Emissions
4. Gaiser- Mute
5. Marc Houle- Porch
6. Troy Pierce- Oxytocin
7. JPLS- Isolate
8. Tractile- The Eel (Bonus Track)
9. Ambivalent- Lowlights (Bonus Track)

The extremely limited edition (30 copies only) printed USB-card format contains CD track listing in WAV and MP3 format. Featuring two special bonus tracks: “The Eel” by Tractile and Ambivalent’s “Lowlights”.

PLEASE NOTE: you can preorder the limited USB-Card now. The shipment will not take place until or after the 3rd of December.

http://www.berlinista.com

This post has been edited by eYe-reEs: Dec 7 2007, 18:16
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fromm
post Dec 7 2007, 18:28
Post #4


...delivered into the hands of indifference.
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 2,872
Joined: 4-May 07
From: iznad tebe
Member No.: 1,367



jako zanimljivo. samples anywhere?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Dec 7 2007, 18:37
Post #5


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



http://m-nus.com
new relases
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Jan 17 2008, 09:23
Post #6


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



" MINUS | 1998 | 2008 | Ten Year Anniversary

Normally I would use the beginning of the new year to reflect on the previous year's highlights, but this January marks an even more important landmark for Minus, as it marks the beginning of our Ten Year Anniversary!

It's a significant moment for me, reflecting over the past 9 years of Minus's history. I am overwhelmed by the amount of things that we have achieved, and I am extremely proud of the accomplishments of our artists. Reflecting on all of these experiences makes me realize how much time and energy has gone into building the foundation of what Minus has become today, however, at the same time it feels as if things came together in a blink of an eye, giving new weight to the term "time flies when you're having fun."

It only seems like yesterday (1990) that John Acquaviva and I were two kids with a dream of releasing our first record on our own credit-card funded label Plus 8, and only days later (sic) in 1997 when Plus 8 had become such a workload of success that we consciously decided to slow things down and take time to focus our attention on new ideas. That was the moment that Minus was born, with the idea of minimizing everything that Plus 8 had become, going back to basics, and starting again from scratch using everything that I had learned through the experiences of Plus 8 and Plastikman. Minus was a new identity; inspired by the connections between art, music and technology, a platform not only for the next steps of my own career, but also for the first steps of emerging artists and friends.

With the help of Clark Warner we started again, and slowly, even cautiously, allowed things to develop. Along the way, we connected with friends who came aboard to help with our mission, remaining inspired, while making sure not to allow the business of music to influence our direction or sound.

Throughout these past nine years our family has continued to grow, not only in terms of Artists, but also with the people behind the scenes. We find ourselves going into 2008 with established offices not only in our original home of Windsor, Canada, but in Berlin, Germany, the new second home for us and many of our friends and Artists.

We are all very excited with what we have in store for our Tenth Year Anniversary, but before we announce too much, we will begin the year with our own celebration - 10 Weeks of Silence! During the first ten weeks of 2008 there will be no new releases and no performances or appearances from any of the Minus Artists (except for perhaps the odd secret testing of new material).

I hope you all enjoy this moment of silence while we reflect and re-focus our energy, ideas and inspiration for the upcoming Ten Year Anniversary celebrations starting in late March 2008. These special Minus | Ten Events will be spread out over the year and throughout the world. A year of new releases, new Artists and new localized technology will follow, strengthening the connection between Minus, our Artists, and our Friends & Supporters worldwide... between our Family and Yours!

I would like to take this moment to thank everyone who has been part of the continuing behind-the-scenes story of Minus, during the early days, Clark,Tim, Jenn, Craig, and Ken, and continuing to today, Vicki, Tosh, Bryan, Katrin, Seth, Ali, Patti, Meike, Rebekah, Franzie, Rudy, Nadine, Jason, Jonathan & Scott, and the ever-continuing support of my brother Matthew and my Mum & Dad.

Thanks to all of the Friends/Artists who have and continue to support the musical foundation of Minus; Madga, Troy, Marc, Jesse, Jon, Jeremy, Kevin, Matt, Barem, Joel & Adam, Mathew & Konrad, Ryan, Dice & Martin, Hannes & Christopher, Josh, Pheek, Jakshun, Ilana, Nacho, Mike, Minx, Dale, Stewart, Swayzak, and Sutekh.

And of course my thanks go to the continued support of all of our Friends, Supporters, Distributors and Partners who continue to help make all of this possible.

Sincerely,


Richie Hawtin"

- eto mojeg cilja za 2008 sto se tice partijanja. popratit ce se ovo slavlje i ovi tourovi minusovaca na koje budem u mogusnocti otic. ko zna mozda dodju tu i u nase krajeve wub.gif

veselim se i ocekujem jos ovakvih 10 godina!!! BRAVO! clap.gif


OLA.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Jan 31 2008, 22:09
Post #7


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



www.mixmag.net
November 2007

The future Issue

A SMALL SLICE OF the future lies in the palm of Richie Hawtin’s hand. “This will be to dance music what guitars were to rock ’n’ roll,” he says triumphantly, his eyes blazing with excitement as he offers up a sleek black gadget for closer inspection. This hand-held device, he explains, is basically the iPod of the turntable world, squeezing all the capabilities of a set of decks and a mixer into a device not much larger than a remote control. He discovered the Pacemaker, made by Swedish company Tonium, with his father and fellow geek outside Barcelona’s Soñar festival in June of this year. “I saw a huge growd gathered around a girl DJing with this small black device,” he says. “It was a huge moment.”

It is moments and discoveries like this that make Richie Hawtin’s life complete. Ever since he heard the alien sounds of Jeff Mills’ prototype electronic music show on Detroit radio as a teenager in the 1980s, techno’s reigning innovator has been captivated by the future. Since his early days DJing as a teenager with a makeshift delay effect at Detroit club Shelter, Richie has strived to push the boundaries of electronic music. His ‘Dex, Fx & 909’ tours of the early 1990s (captured on one of the first Mixmag covermount CDs) advanced the idea of what a DJ could do beyond just mixing one record into another. Records like his groundbreaking ‘Spastik’ spearheaded mutant strains of techno that have come full circle to influence today’s thriving techno scene. From his new home of Berlin his Minus record label is unwaveringly dedicated to discovering new ways of creating dance music, and his ‘DE 9 Transitions’ CD rewired the way DJs approach mix CDs (instead of a sequence of tracks Richie spliced his favourite records into individual slivers and reassembled them as one whole new piece of music using revolutionary DJ/production software Ableton Live).

Hawtin’s fascination with new technologies and ways of thinking about club music has earned him a reputation as dance music’s authority on the future, not to mention work as a consultant for pioneering companies like Beatport and Allen & Heath. He can thank his lifestyle as a globe-trotting DJ for granting him a unique perspective on the world. In the past two weeks he’s been to LA, New York, Windsor in Canada, back to Germany and on to London, Tokyo, then Mount Fuji, on to Saporo and back to Tokyo, before flying to Ibiza. He’s been in this constant flux of time-zones and jet lag for almost 17 years. “I distinctly remember a conversation I had with Jeff Mills a few years back about being futurists,” he says. “Not only because we tried to make futuristic music, but because we were living 20 years ahead of the mass population. Travel doesn’t mean anything to us; skipping over to Tokyo and back to New York in twenty-four hours is part of our routine.”

Today, firing off a volley of texts from his smartphone at the end of the Ibiza season, Richie Hawtin is as alive as he’s ever been. A blonde mop of hair makes him look far younger than his 37 years. In three days’ time he’ll host his Minus party at futuristic superclub Amnesia. It’s one of the most hotly anticipated dates on the techno calendar and a taster for what’s to come in electronic music — perfect timing, then, to pick the brains of one of dance music’s fastest imaginations on the future of club culture.



So why do you keep coming back to the future?
Because I don’t want to get old. I want to feel young and connected to the pulse of life. To me, life is an ever- changing, evolving world of traveling, meeting new people and searching for something new or exciting or better. Plus I get bored very easily.

What’s next for clubs?
I’ve been reading a lot about ‘tele-presence’ – £500,000 communication systems designed for the world of corporate America. You sit around half of a circular desk looking at screens showing a group of people on the other side of the world sitting around a similar-looking, other half of a circular desk. Imagine that in a club. To have two rooms, one Womb in Tokyo and the other Womb in London, and a dividing wall that would be a mirror image of the other city. Or imagine if you build a new club and the interior surfaces of that room are made from projections or high resolution displays, so that it can be a black club or it can be anywhere or anything. It could start to become a pseudo-holodeck, like in Star Trek. The technology is already there. Daft Punk’s LED light pyramid is an example of an object built out of a high resolution display whose images can be manipulated to move with the music.

The world is changing incredibly fast. Is it a good or a bad thing?
I have this overwhelming optimism that technology will save the day. My friends are from all over the world. Older people, especially parents, can’t understand how I can have friends like that – but physical presence doesn’t make connections between people any more. It solidifies a connection, but you don’t need it to maintain that connection. Social networking technology allows me to feel that I’m connected to my friends when I’m not physically present. Now, the scariest thing for me is that when I get old I won’t be able to travel so much and maintain these connections that I’ve made by traveling physically. But I’m optimistic that there’ll be a new way of connecting when I get to that point in my life. And I hope another advance will come when I really need it: a set of bionic ears!

How has technology changed your life as a DJ since you began playing?
A DJ’s life has changed more than that of any other performer. We’re touring all the time and this lifestyle has only become possible in the last 15 years because of advancements in technology. When I first started playing, we did everything by fax. Traveling was a very lonely experience. Now in airports I have Bluetooth connectivity with my computer so that even when I’m in a taxi I’m ichatting to my mum, dad or brother or sending a file or an email. No matter where I travel, I’m still connected to my world.

It must be weird constantly moving between time zones. Do you ever wake up disorientated, not knowing where you are?
I get disorientated when I’m in one place for too long. If I’m home for two weeks I get this strange, off-balance feeling that everything should change.

Thanks to low-cost airlines the ravers must be catching up!
Definitely. You’re now experiencing what we’ve been doing for 15 years. The advent of low-cost airlines, the creation of the EU and the Euro – all these things have made clubland explode again. Quite often these days I’ll do a series of gigs in different countries and see the same people at each one. Now it’s cheaper to go to Berlin for a night without a hotel than it is to travel nationally and drink beer all night. And thanks to social networking there’s more connectivity between people. They’re more open to different ideas, and that’s opening up new musical and artistic ways of thinking.

You’re one of the first DJs to actually do something about global warming. When did the threat start to hit home?
DJs are racking up more air miles than any other musicians. I started looking out at these beautiful sunsets while taking off from São Paolo or wherever, and thinking, ‘This is amazing, but is my enjoyment of this moment going to take away this possible moment for my son?’

So how are you making a difference?
The first idea was offsetting my carbon footprint. It was easy to calculate how many miles I was flying and by extension how much CO2 I was putting into the atmosphere. We found a carbon offsetting company based in Berlin who calculate how much carbon you produce by flying or driving, and from whom you can buy an offset. The money then goes to environmentally conscious projects around the world. DJs make good livings, and if we can’t put a little bit of that back then perhaps we don’t deserve to live the lavish lifestyles that some of us enjoy.

But will it really help?
A colleague of mine argued that it’s not going to make a difference, so why bother? That’s fucking bullshit. The worst thing that could happen is that OK, maybe it doesn’t make much of a difference. But at least I’ve tried.

You’ve been the midwife at the birth of both Final Scratch [software that allows you to use your laptop to mix records] and Beatport. What’s next?
The Pacemaker is a whole new way for kids to become excited about music. This is something you put in your pocket and when you’re at school in the playground you can pull it out and start mixing tracks.

Does it scare you that a whole generation of kids are growing up not knowing what vinyl is?
For me I’ll always have a fascination with records because I grew up with them, but do I need them? Not really. Not only do they take up way too much space, they’re technically limiting and environmentally unfriendly. We’re moving to a point where vinyl will be a limited specialised market for people who choose to collect records as pieces of art.

Many DJs like your close friends Zip and Ricardo Villalobos argue that vinyl is far superior...
You could choose to sell vinyl to that small, non-expanding market, close your eyes to what’s happening, let everyone copy your music and just be cynical about it. Or you can choose to find a way to appease both of those things. The quality of digital is as good if not better than vinyl. Music begins life as a digital WAV file before it is mastered and turned into vinyl. But as a performer I have to learn new tools and ways of thinking in order to move forward in my art, so these arguments are irrelevant for me.

So is digital technology making music better?
Technology is democratising music and allowing more people than ever to enjoy what we do. I don’t want to explain to a kid in Ecuador why my song isn’t available on the internet if it’s only available on vinyl. I want him to hear my song, get into what we’re doing and maybe that might send him on a new direction in his life.

Now that digital music has taken sound experience close to perfection, can it get any better?
The next step for clubs is to build immersive sound environments. Instead of four stacks of speakers they’ll use, perhaps, 36 micro-speakers to spread the sound around you. This opens lots of possibilities. Now music performance is so loop-based, imagine if you could make one side of the room experience something slightly different from what people on the other side are hearing.

How is technology changing the art of DJing?
I’m a little bit bored by only being able to manipulate things in a record paradigm. When we started Final Scratch [Richie was one of the first investors in the company] we saw it as a technology bridge from the analogue to the digital world, and I feel it’s time to get off the bridge. A further step would be a larger, iPhone-style multi-touch screen. And further from that some kind of wireless hand interaction where you can manipulate different components of sound by changing the movement of your hands. It’s hard to visualize, but imagine something like the screens they use in [sci-fi film] Minority Report. You’re still using your body to interact with something digital, but through moving and pinching and grabbing you’re able to go deeper into the possibilities of how you work it. Technology can only work for a performer if it’s visually interesting for a crowd to watch.

MySpace and Facebook have changed how we make friends and plan our social lives. What’s next for social networking?
I know people working on internet sites that will one day be to music what YouTube is to video. For our scene a really good social network based upon music could be amazing. The next step could also be social networks merging with phones and next-generation GPS systems to create a device that can tell you which of your friends are nearby, and what people in a club you’re in have similar interests.

Will downloading kill music?
Last year Minus wrote our biggest royalty cheques ever because of digital sales. If people can buy stuff digitally at a good price they generally will. People don’t want to rip other people off as long as they don’t feel they’re getting ripped off themselves. To do this properly you need to be able to track what’s happening with a record and bring people into an on-demand service. Why own 100 records when you can have anything you want, whenever you want? There’s a company called Sound Cloud looking at sharing music on a global scale. But you could take things even further. Right now an MP3’s tags can tell you basic information about a track like its name or artist. But what if you could encode more than that? You could break each track down into its individual loops and elements, and each of these elements and loops would be encoded with information about what influenced them or who made them. Then you could start to build a way of tracing how a track came to be. It would work like a genetic code so that in ten years’ time you could trace a track’s family tree, looking at where it came from and the software or machines that created it.

So are you saying we should get rid of ownership of music?
I’d like to get to a place where I don’t even have to carry a computer or a mechanical storage device for music. I don’t care if I have some physical object that contains these non physical assets, I’d like all my music stored somewhere and to be able bring that list down whenever I need it. So imagine if you had this cloud where all these songs were stored and encoded and you could pluck them down in real time during a performance? But what if you want to get deeper and you want to have just the high hats from a track and map them over the sound from another song playing. This kind of interactivity is where I want to get to. Getting down to the molecular level of songs. That would be amazing.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fromm
post Feb 1 2008, 17:52
Post #8


...delivered into the hands of indifference.
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 2,872
Joined: 4-May 07
From: iznad tebe
Member No.: 1,367



"i dunno, its gonna be... i have a feeling its gonna be faster."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Apr 27 2008, 12:39
Post #9


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



MINUS & COSMOPOP present




-matthew dear


-heartthrob


-marco


-loco dice


-richie hawtin


-steve bug

Berlin has become a destination point for clubbers from all around the world with hundreds of people migrating towards the city every weekend, enjoying its ever-evolving musical soundtrack. A soundtrack created by dozens of local and international DJ’s and artists, many of who call Berlin their home. You can always be sure to find a label night of Cadenza, Minus, Cocoon or Pokerflat. But there is something missing!!

We are happy to announce an event to which we’ve invited as many of our favourite DJ’s, artists and labels to come together in celebration of the music that we all love:

the “Sunday Adventure Club” Open Air

… come and celebrate with us!


Date: Sunday June 15th, 2008

Location: open air location near the Postbahnhof, Berlin
large outside area with 1 stage, 2 inside floors
in case of rain, the event will be indoors

Opening hours: outside stage 10am-10pm, inside stages 6pm until open end

Line up: richie hawtin, josh wink, luciano, matthew dear's big hands, karotte, tobi neumann, zip, magda, marc houle live, paco osuna, troy pierce, matt john, guido schneider, steve bug, heartthrob live, konrad black, loco dice & marco carola back to back, rebekah aff, cassy

Ticket prices: 15EUR pre-sale
Tickets will be available after Friday 25.04. on www.sundayadventureclub.de or at your nearest CTS/Eventim box office. Limited capacity, get your ticket now!!



sundayadventureclub
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post May 11 2008, 11:37
Post #10


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19







http://contakt-events.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Oct 4 2008, 15:00
Post #11


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



[Interview] JPLS exclusive for mnml.nl

JPLS’ analog attitude is stripped down amongst the ever-growing digital landscape of expanding sound fields. Recording as JPLS with recent net releases on Clever and Redevice he made his first Minus appearance on 2006’s ‘min2MAX’ compilation also performing live in Detroit in May for the ‘min2MAX’ launch showcase. Jacobs’ sound falls into a range of dub-punched techno while under the minimal aesthetic from the top down. His mode of procedure emphasizes the cerebral effects of “less is more” and works with precision versus surrounding his sound with clutter.

So I understand you’re on a little European tour right now, how’s it been so far and what were some of the highlights?
It’s been really good. Especially playing in Rome and having the entire label with. I think there were like 8 000 - 10 000 people in front of me while I played. Not only that but being able to play across midnight so kind of being the one to bring minus into the new year. That was a pretty good highlight.

How different is playing in Europe as opposed to playing in the states?
Completely different, even though I haven’t played much in the U.S. But people in Europe party way harder.
In the U.S. it’s more laid back. Everything closes a lot earlier, a lot of bars have to close at like 2 or 3am, whereas over here it’s when everything’s going. So, a lot better I guess.

Any plans of moving to Berlin to join the rest of the Minus crew?
Not yet. It’s funny, that’s a question I get all the time. Berlin’s cool and I like Europe but I do such good work in the U.S. because I don’t have anything to do there. I like feeling really isolated from everything else. It’s like everything’s happening in Berlin and fucking everyone’s there and if I’m somewhere really far away then I can kinda shelter myself and just get completely into what I’m doing. So as far as right now I’ll still be in the U.S.
I think I’ll be one out of two minus artists that aren’t in Berlin.

You’re from Indiana, how is the techno scene there? If there is a scene at all.
There is no techno scene there. There might be some people who might argue slightly in Indianapolis but where I live there is no techno. I’m really close to Chicago though and I grew up even closer to the city. There’s a scene there that’s decent but nothing like over here (Europe). I mean I don’t live there for the techno scene, it’s just because it’s what I’m used to. It’s really, really quiet, nothing going on but I like it.

How did you get into techno then?
I started listening to industrial music when I was really young. I’d never really listened to music before that.
It was a couple of good friends of mine who got me into it and it was all like Chicago's wax trax and that had kinda like a techno edge to it and it was cool but I wasn’t really huge into it. But then one of my friends had a mix tape, I don’t even know who it was, I was like 13 at that time, and it had this fucking classic Josh Wink track on it that blew me away completely and it was ever since then that was it for me. But still, there’s no real defining moment where like my life is techno, but it was right there in the background I guess.

Who are some of the people that you would say that have influenced your current sound the most?
I think conceptually, Rich (Hawtin) has, off course. I’m not trying to emulate his sound but I guess I’m inspired by how everything he does has a really deep concept to it and I think that’s where I want to go as well. But besides Rich a lot of my inspiration comes from not really normal techno artists like Autechre or Aphex Twin. They’re huge influences for me. Even going outside of the techno realm, a lot of Tricky’s older work or Massive Attack because their stuff is really deep. I’ll listen to my stuff and I think it almost sounds shallow compared to the rhythms and the sounds they use.

Who are some of the current artists that you like?
Onur Özer’s one that has been really killing me, Paco Osuna who has a new Plus 8 record out...fucking so good, Pär Grindvik, and anything Wagon Repair puts out I always love immediately as well. Skoozbot is always driving me crazy...he has a sick track coming out with some insane remixes.
Gaiser’s new work has been fantastic..well, at least what I have heard of it. I usually have to get him pretty drunk before I can snag copies Wink

How did you hook up with Richie Hawtin and get signed on Minus?
I stalked him for five years, seriously. I followed him around Chicago and Detroit. I think I started in 2000 and I just gave him music every time and never really talked to him. I did that straight for five years. I never really wanted to say anything to him, if he liked my music and thought it fit then that was cool, that’s what I wanted. And if he didn’t then I’d just keep going or whatever. That’s pretty much the basic story on that one.

How do you respond to things like all the recent talk about this issue of Minus hype?
I think it’s a lot of people who have an issue with general minus fans...anyone complaining about it, I think that’s the actual hype around the label.
For whatever reason Rich is such a center of attention for everything he does, whether it’s the label, my record or his haircut, there’s always this focus on him and the label. And I can understand how some people could be turned off by that because there’s always this focus on the same group of people.
But there’s always people talking about the label, whether it’s good or bad, and I think that’s the whole grounding of this hype that we have. And if it’s bad publicity or not it’s still publicity for the label and it’s still putting the name out there.
I think it’s funny it’s like this recursive social structure where people bitch about how they’re sick of Rich getting all the attention and then more people see that and more people bitch about it.

What do you think about the recent (over)use of the word ‘minimal’?
I don’t think the word minimal counts as a genre. Techno or house, that’s a genre and within it you have a certain approach and whereas that approach and the result is something that is minimal or stripped down. Especially with what I do, I will start with rhythms and then I’ll start breaking them down, kind of deconstructing them. I think with a lot of my stuff it isn’t necessarily simple but the overall rhythm and structure is completely simple. It’s very reduced and it’s only what is needed to get the point across. And that’s what I think minimal techno is. I’ll never call it just ‘minimal’ because I think minimal is an adjective for techno being the subject of what we’re talking about. That’s my stance on that.

You released on the netlabels Redevice and Clever Music, will you be releasing anymore stuff on netlabels in the future?
No. I’m exclusive to Minus now. As far as the netlabels go I still really like the idea of releasing as digital only for free. I think I still have that option with Minus and there might be some things in the future where it's free digital only.

What future releases have you got coming up?
Well there’s the Twilite album, which should be out some time around May. That will be six of my own tracks, one track will be remixed by Skoozbot, and then there’ll be another highly sought after track remixed by skoozbot as well included. I guess that’s kinda all I’ll say right now about those. After Twilite there should be a very strange release in the late fall and then next year followed by something that I guess you’ll get more information on later.

Skoozbot remixed some of your tracks. Are you planning on returning the favor or doing any remixes for someone else?
Right now I’m not accepting remixes for anyone just because I don’t have enough time to work on my own sht. But that’s excluding Brians’ (Skoozbot) tracks though. There are a few that I have been working on and I’m sure those’ll show up somewhere. So I guess he kind of has the exclusive remixes right now.

Do you mainly use software to produce or some hardware as well?
I use software to sequence and record everything. I do have some old, strange hardware on the side that I work with as well. But right now it’s primarily Ableton and Pro Tools. Sampler has been a really great tool for me lately.

What’s your setup when you play live?
A laptop with Ableton, a controller and a lot of plug ins.

Do you rather play live or work on tracks in the studio?
I think it’s kind of two very different things. I really like just being comfortable with my headphones or speakers and just producing late at night on my own time, but it’s such a good time partying and having a huge crowd in front of you and have that recursive interface of crowd reaction to what you’re playing back and forth.
But if I had to choose I’d probably be producing. That’s where I can really get every idea out of my head.

Any ambitions as a dj?
Not especially. I’ve thought about it and it’s been in the background, but for right now I’m more interested in seeing what I can do live then in spinning records. But it’s definitely possible in the future.

Where do you hope to be 10 years from now?
I have no idea. I hope I’m still making techno and I hope it sounds far different from what I’m doing now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Nov 4 2008, 19:58
Post #12


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Richie Hawtin + Magda @ Tenax 26.04.08



clap.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Nov 4 2008, 20:53
Post #13


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



BAREM - 10 Days Off 2008

http://rapidshare.com/files/132476614/bare...-22-07-2008.mp3
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Nov 18 2008, 19:16
Post #14


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Beatportal video interview: Richie Hawtin goes green

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Nov 18 2008, 19:41
Post #15


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



netko je pitao kako b definirali špicu. e pa evo ovako:

Mr. Minimal - RICHIE HAWTIN @ BEATPORT WMC 2008 - HMTV 173

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Nov 18 2008, 19:43
Post #16


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Richie Hawtin @ Remix Hotel Miami 2008

wub.gif

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Nov 18 2008, 19:51
Post #17


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



ipak je ova špica špica ...

RICHIE HAWTIN - TIMEWARP 2008 last video



koja stvarcina preeedobrrrraa wub.gif .. Ricardo Villalobos "Enfants"

jedan super komentar sam nasla: 'richie playin ricardo - thats like being in paradies! '

a sto su ludi, a sto im je dobroooo ... jao jao .. ovaj sto ga non stop dira je navodno DJ Luciano koji je full raspolozen laugh.gif

koja dubina cool.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Nov 18 2008, 19:54
Post #18


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



RICHIE HAWTIN @TIME WARP 2008 APERTURA



- sven luuuud!!! laugh.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Nov 18 2008, 19:58
Post #19


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



RICHIE HAWTIN - TIMEWARP 2008



YEKE YEKE hahaha, znamo koje su ure bile.. al sto jest jest - covjek je apsolutni genije! špica-maker totalni ..

hail.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Mar 13 2009, 13:48
Post #20


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Create Minus' Next Music Video

With the new Louderbach album "Autumn" coming out soon, Minus has arranged a contest for the lead in single from the new album.
Due to be released on April 6th, 2009 the contest will consist of creating the actual 3-minute music video entitled "Shine". The last date of submission will be April 2nd, 2009 just three weeks away!

The winner will have their material used as the official video for the single and will be used as a promotional tool by Minus. Apart from that, the winner will also receive signed copies of the Louderbach single and album.

Please follow the provided link to enter:

http://m-nus.com/#contest.html;Middle



m-nus.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: April 22, 2024 16:46