Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

4 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> travels, mix
eYe-reEs
post Mar 1 2010, 10:51
Post #21


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Coastal Road In The Mekong Delta

Vietnam builds coastal road link to Cambodia and Thailand

By eTN Staff Writer | Feb 25, 2010


Coastal road in Nha Trang city, Khanh Hoa province, Vietnam / VNExpress photo via lookatvietnam.com

According to Vietnamese media sources, construction will begin next month on
a 220-km long coastal road in the Mekong Delta as part of an international
highway linking the country with Cambodia and Thailand, the project's
management board recently announced.

Running through the provinces of Ca Mau and Kien Giang, the US$440 million
road will be built in cooperation with the governments of South Korea and
Australia, as well as the Asian Development Bank with its seat in Manila,
Philippines.

Once it is completed, the road will be part of a nearly 1,000-kilometer link
known as the Thailand-Cambodia-Vietnam Southern Coastal Road Economic
Corridor, starting at Bangkok and ending at Ca Mau Province's Nam Can
District.

The road would create more opportunities for Kien Giang and Ca Mau to
develop their economies and promote tourism, according to Duong Tien Dung,
vice chairman of the Ca Mau's People's Committee.

ADB experts, meanwhile, said that as the road mainly ran through the three
countries' poorest provinces, it would provide greater access to basic
social services for local people and encourage development of local
economies.

eTurboNews
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Mar 22 2010, 14:57
Post #22


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Volcanic eruption disrupts flights in Iceland


Image via inewp.com

By Stefan Helgi Valsson, eTN | Mar 21, 2010

A volcanic eruption started in Mt. Eyjafjallajokull glacier in the southwest of Iceland shortly before midnight on Saturday night. About 500 people evacuated the immediate area below the mountain in fear of the area being flooded with melt water from the glacier. All airports within 120 nautical mile radius were immediately closed in accordance with standard safety rules. The present nature of the eruption does not impose threat to people, livestock, buildings, or roads.

Eight hundred passengers of Icelandair and Iceland Express scheduled to leave Iceland Sunday morning were delayed and another 500 Icelandair passengers who left Boston, Orlando, and Seattle on Saturday night were redirected to Boston. Flights from Iceland are expected to be delayed 5 hours and flights from Boston to Iceland 12 hours.

The eruption is of a lava-type and is currently limited to a 500-meter-long fissure on the north side of the 1100-meter-high Fimmvorduhals pass. The pass, which lies beteen Mt. Eyjafjallajokull and Mt. Myrdalsjokull, is one of Iceland‘s most popular hiking routes.

The new lava field is certain to become a tourist attraction for hikers along the Fimmvorduhals hiking trail that usually takes about 10 hours to complete. The trail lies between Skogafoss waterfall, a well known landmark in the South of Iceland and Thorsmork nature reserve north of Skogar.

A volcanic eruption takes place in Iceland every 4-5 years on the average. Mt. Eyjafjallajokull glacier last erupted in 1821.

eTurboNews

Fimmvorduhals hiking trail
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Mar 25 2010, 10:48
Post #23


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Top 10 Places You Don’t Want To Visit

10: Great Pacific Garbage Patch (Pacific Ocean)


The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, also described as the Pacific Trash Vortex, is a gyre of marine litter in the central North Pacific Ocean located roughly between 135° to 155°W and 35° to 42°N. Most current estimates state that it is larger than the U.S. state of Texas, with some estimates claiming that it is larger than the continental United States, however the exact size is not known for sure. The Patch is characterized by exceptionally high concentrations of pelagic plastics, chemical sludge, and other debris that have been trapped by the currents of the North Pacific Gyre. The patch is not easily visible because it consists of very small pieces, almost invisible to the naked eye, most of its contents are suspended beneath the surface of the ocean. This is not a place the average Joe would want to visit.

9: Izu Islands (Japan)


The Izu Islands are a group of volcanic islands stretching south and east from the Izu Peninsula of Honshū, Japan. Administratively, they form two towns and six villages; all part of Tokyo. The largest is Izu Ōshima, usually called simply Ōshima. Because of their volcanic nature, the islands are constantly filled with the stench of sulfur (extremely similar to the smell of thousands of farts). Residents were evacuated from the islands in 1953 and 2000 due to volcanic activity and dangerously high levels of gas. The people returned in 2005 but are now required to carry gas masks with them at all times in case gas levels rise unexpectedly.

8: The Door to Hell (Turkmenistan)


Address: Derweze, Turkmenistan
This has featured on listverse before, but it would be remiss of us to exclude it from this list. While drilling in Derweze in Turkmenistan in 1971, geologists accidentally found an underground cavern filled with natural gas. The ground beneath the drilling rig collapsed, leaving a large hole with a diameter of about 50-100 meters. To avoid poisonous gas discharge, scientists decided to set fire to the hole. Geologists had hoped the fire would go out in a few days but it has been burning ever since. Locals have named the cavern The Door to Hell. As you can see from the picture above, it is one hell of an amazing place, but certainly one you wouldn’t want to visit.

7: Alnwick Poison Gardens (England)


Address: Denwick Lane, Alnwick, NE66 1YU, England
Inspired by the Botanical Gardens in Padua, Italy (the first botanical garden which was created to grow medicinal and poisonous plants in the 1500s), the Alnwick Poison Garden is a garden devoted entirely to plants that can kill. It features many plants grown unwittingly in back gardens, and those that grow in the British countryside, as well as many more unusual varieties. Flame-shaped beds contain belladonna, tobacco and mandrake. The Alnwick Garden has a Home Office license to grow some very special plants; namely, cannabis and coca which are found behind bars in giant cages – for obvious reasons.

6: Asbestos Mine (Canada)


Address: Thetford-Mines, Quebec, Canada
Asbestos is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals highly prized for their resistance to fire and sound absorption abilities. On the downside, exposure to this stuff causes cancer and a variety of other diseases. It is so dangerous that the European Union has banned all mining and use of asbestos in Europe. But, for those curious enough to want to get close to the stuff, all is not lost. In Canada at the Thetford Mines, you can visit an enormous open pit asbestos mine which is still fully operational. The workers in the mines aren’t required to wear any sort of respiratory protection, and in some sections of the nearby town, residential areas are butted right next up against piles of asbestos waste. The mine offers bus tours of the deadly environment during the summer months. Tickets are free (would you expect it to be any other way?). If you decide to visit, don’t forget your full body bio-hazard suit.

5: Ramree Island (Burma)


Ramree Island in Burma is a huge swamp home to 1000s of salt water enormous salt water crocodiles, the deadliest in the world. It is also home to malaria carrying mosquitos, and venomous scorpions. During the Second World War, the island was the site of a six week battle in the Burma campaign. Here is a description of one of those horrifying nights: “That night [of the 19 February 1945] was the most horrible that any member of the M.L. [motor launch] crews ever experienced. The scattered rifle shots in the pitch black swamp punctured by the screams of wounded men crushed in the jaws of huge reptiles, and the blurred worrying sound of spinning crocodiles made a cacophony of hell that has rarely been duplicated on earth. At dawn the vultures arrived to clean up what the crocodiles had left…Of about 1,000 Japanese soldiers that entered the swamps of Ramree, only about 20 were found alive.”

4: Yungas Road (Bolivia)


The North Yungas Road (Road of Death or Death Road) is a 61 kilometres (38 mi) or 69 kilometres (43 mi) road leading from La Paz to Coroico, 56 kilometres (35 mi) northeast of La Paz in the Yungas region of Bolivia. It is legendary for its extreme danger with estimates stating that 200 to 300 travelers are killed yearly along it. The road includes crosses marking many of the spots where vehicles have fallen. The road was built in the 1930s during the Chaco War by Paraguayan prisoners. It is one of the few routes that connects the Amazon rainforest region of northern Bolivia, or Yungas, to its capital city. Because of the extreme dropoffs of at least 600 metres (2,000 ft), single-lane width – most of the road no wider than 3.2 metres (10 ft) and lack of guard rails, the road is extremely dangerous. Further still, rain, fog and dust can make visibility precarious. In many places the road surface is muddy, and can loosen rocks from the road.

3: Mud Volcanoes of Azerbaijan (Azerbaijan)


In the Spring of 2001, volcanic activity under the Caspian Sea off the Azeri coast created a whole new island. In October 2001 there was an impressive volcanic eruption in Azerbaijan at Lokbatan, but there were no casualties or evacuation warnings. But Azerbaijan does not have a single active volcano, at least not in the usual sense of the word. What Azerbaijan does have is mud volcanoes – hundreds of them. Mud volcanoes are the little-known relatives of the more common magmatic variety. They do erupt occasionally with spectacular results, but are generally not considered to be dangerous – unless you happen to be there at the wrong time: every twenty years or so, a mud volcano explodes with great force, shooting flames hundreds of meters into the sky, and depositing tonnes of mud on the surrounding area. In one eruption, the flames could easily be seen from 15 kilometers away on the day of the explosion, and were still burning, although at a lower level, three days later.

2 :The Zone of Alienation (Eastern Europe)


The Zone of Alienation is the 30 km/19 mi exclusion zone around the site of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster and is administrated by a special administration under the Ukrainian Ministry of Extraordinary Situations (Emergencies). Thousands of residents refused to be evacuated from the zone or illegally returned there later. Over the decades this primarily elderly population has dwindled, falling below 400 in 2009. Approximately half of these resettlers live in the town of Chernobyl; others are spread in villages across the zone. After recurrent attempts at expulsion, the authorities became reconciled to their presence and even allowed limited supporting services for them. Because of looting, there is a strong police presence – so be warned, if you visit, you may either be shot or get radiation poisoning – and we all know how awful that can be.

1: Ilha de Queimada Grande (Brazil)


Off the shore of Brazil, almost due south of the heart of São Paulo, is a Ilha de Queimada Grande (Snake Island). The island is untouched by human developers, and for very good reason. Researchers estimate that on the island live between one and five snakes per square meter. That figure might not be so terrible if the snakes were, say, 2 inches long and nonvenomous. The snakes on Queimada Grande, however, are a unique species of pit viper, the golden lancehead. The lancehead genus of snakes is responsible for 90% of Brazilian snakebite-related fatalities. The golden lanceheads that occupy Snake Island grow to well over half a meter long, and they possess a powerful fast-acting poison that melts the flesh around their bites. This place is so dangerous that a permit is required to visit.

source

* ja mislim da bi ja svugdje osim u zmije i krokodile biggrin.gif super post!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Mar 25 2010, 10:58
Post #24


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



VIDEO: Top 10 pustinja svijeta
Tako lijepe i surove


Sahara

I Stipe Božić, najuspješniji hrvatski alpinist i jedan od najboljih na svijetu, odlučio je obići veličanstvene pustinje. Za sve one koji će vjerojatnu pustinjama putovati samo u svojim snovima donosimo njih deset naj.

● Salar de Uyuni

Ovo čudo prirode, pustinja od soli koja se nalazi u Boliviji u potpunosti će promijeniti vašu koncepciju pustinje. Najveća je slana pustinja u svijetu i njezina ljepota nadmašuje svaka očekivanja. Zbog svojih prirodnih divota privlači turiste avanturiste iz cijeloga svijeta. Pustinja Salar de Uyuni je 40.000 godina staro jezero koje je presušilo te stvorilo ogromne blokove soli.



● Sahara

Sahara je najveća vruća pustinja na Zemlji, (oko 9 milijuna četvornih kilometara) i pokriva veći dio sjeverne Afrike. Postoji preko 3.5 tisuća godina, a teško je i zamisliti da je ova pustoš nekoć bila plodna.



● Gobi

Najhladnija i najsjevernija pješčana pustinja na svijetu - Gobi, a proteže južnim dijelom Mongolije i sjeverom Kine. Još se naziva i Flaming Cliffs zato što osim pješčanih dina koje zauzimaju tek tri posto pustinje ima mnoštvo narančastih kamenja i stijena.



● Wadi Rum

Pustinja Wadi Rum za koju kažu da je najljepša od svih svjetskih pustinja nalazi se u Jordanu. Pustinja je prepuna stjenovitih planina i pruža poglede od kojih zastaje dah. Pustinja je zaštićeno područje kako bi se očuvale njezine prirodne ljepote.



● Thar

Pustinja Thar smještena je na zapadu Rajasthana, savezne države Indije koja je ujedno i najveća država u Indiji po površini. Milje i milje pijeska ispod sunca koje prži obilježje su ove pustinje, a njezina ljepota leži u njezinim slikovitim stanovnicima.



● Patagonija

Patagonija je pustinja na jugu Argentine i jedna je od najvećih pustinja na svijetu, a najveća u Južnoj Americi. Neki ovo pusto područje zovu kraj svijeta. Ovo je jedan od najsušnijih i najvjetrovitijih predjela na Zemlji i Patagonija spada u hladne pustinje.



● Atacama

Atacama je najsuša pustinja na svijetu smještena duž obale Čilea, u Južnoj Americi, na obali Tihog oceana. Za razliku od drugih pustinja, kao što su Sahara u Africi i Mojave u Kaliforniji, Atacama je, u stvari veoma hladno mjesto s prosječnom dnevnom temperaturom između 0°C i 25°C. Atacama je upravo najpoznatija po tome što u nekim njezinim krajevima nije nikada pala kiša, ili koliko je poznato najmanje 400 godina.



● Antarktika

Malo je poznato da je najveća i najsušnija pustinja na svijetu Antarktika. Polarne pustinje privlače posjetitelje svojom ljepotom i surovošću. Istodobno plaše i upozoravaju koliko priroda može biti okrutna, a čovjek nemoćan u borbi protiv nje.


Source: Wikipedia

● Kalahari

Kalahari je pustinja u južnoj Africi. Površina joj je oko 900,000 kilometara četvornih. Kalahari je pustinja bogata ugljenom i uranijem. Jedan od najvećih rudnika dijamanata u svijetu se nalazi u Orapi, u sjeveroistočnom djelu pustinje.



● Mojave

Mojave pustinja nalazi se u Sjevernoj Americi. Kamene stijene, kaktusi, pijesak i isušena slana jezera. To su velika pusta područja u kišnoj sjeni gorskih lanaca Stjenjaka i Siere. U pustinji Mojave padne manje od 25 centimetara kiše na godinu.



Source: blogs.iguides.org

net.hr/putovanja

This post has been edited by eYe-reEs: Mar 25 2010, 10:59
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Mar 30 2010, 13:48
Post #25


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Countries that can still be travelled on the cheap

Cash-flow issues? Global recession getting you down? No budget, no problem – in this extract from Lonely Planet’s 1000 Ultimate Experiences, we bring you the destinations that will blow your mind without blowing your budget.

INDIA

India Varanasi main ghat steps down to river Ganges with iconic pilgrims and bathers at river Ganges Jan 2007

India has been known as a cheap destination for ages. But what you might not realise is that there is a lot more to India than just Bollywood films, elephant rides and crazy traffic. Forget just checking out the Taj – what about a trip to the north? Go climbing in LADAKH, where the peaks are huge and the air is cool. Or what about surfing in PORT BLAIR – it’s in the middle of the Bay of Bengal and still cheap as chips. This classic shoestring destination is still ripe for adventure.

NEPAL

The Karnali River, Western Nepal

The home of Mt Everest and the Sherpa people has long been on the radar of the budget traveller. After decades in the limelight Nepal still remains one of the best budget destinations around. The trekking is awesome and the fractional cost of being in the country means that the treks can go on and on. Many a seasoned traveller has Nepal at the top of their best-of list – and the best part is, it won’t cost a fortune to add it to yours.

INDONESIA

Clam curry.

Indonesia has had a bad run of terrible press over the past few years. Between bombings and other strife it’s fallen off the to-do lists of many tourists. Their loss is our gain: the pristine beaches are still the drawcard and you can experience the same dirt-cheap living that has always been on offer. If you’re keen to surf or lie on the beach you’re all set to have an adventure for peanuts. As long as you steer clear of tourist trap resorts, you’ll struggle to spend more than US$20 a day. Nourish your inner cheapskate and buy souvenirs away from the tourist areas; head to the central market in DENPASAR or Ubud’s PASAR SUKOWATI.

IRAN

Stunning lush scenery surrounding Zagros Mountain range in south-west Iran.

Iran? The same Iran that’s in the ‘Axis of Evil’? Forget that propaganda and get stuck into a country that meets all the requirements. For a start it’s cheap: for US$25 a day you can live it up in a midrange hotel and eat your heart out. What you won’t find is a glut of other travellers and the hindrance of mass tourism. You’ll see the wonders of the ancient world without a tour group in sight. In fact this is a country that is crying out for visitors, and is deserving of them – the locals are unbelievably welcoming to travellers. Arrive in January for the ancient Persian midwinter festival of Sadeh, which celebrates the creation of fire.

POLAND

Overhead of Old Town from St. Mary's Basilica Church Tower.

Eastern Europe used to be dirt cheap back in the good old days of the Cold War. Now that peace has broken out, costs are on the up. Poland, though, is still at the inexpensive end: a daily budget of US$25 will easily get you around the country. Poland is a nation that’s been run over so many times by invading forces that it’s become bulletproof. Now this EU member is on the rise, so get in quick before the prices go up for good. Rural towns are picturesque and cheap to visit; tiny towns like Krasnystaw in the Lubelskie region are a miser’s wonderland.

LAOS

The 16th century Pha That Luang (Great Sacred Stupa) is a symbol of both the Buddhist religion and Lao sovereignty, Vientiane

Southeast Asia is the promised land of cheap travel – for years THAILAND was the de facto destination for the cash poor but these days travellers are looking beyond the old standards for more intrepid el-cheapo places to check out. Enter Laos. It may not have the beaches of Thailand or the notoriety of VIETNAM but it’s got what counts. For just US$15 a day you will get all you need, leaving you free to get out among the untouched river valleys and chilled-out microvillages along the Mekong River. The cheapest way to get there is to enter via boat from CHIANG-KHONG, Thailand. The boat ride costs around US$0.50; the visa, payable in Laos, should be around US$30. The best things in life really are free – such as the utterly gorgeous limestone waterfalls at Tat Sae in Laos.

SUDAN

Building by sea, Suakin.

It’s hard to get to, hard to get into and hard to wrap your head around. Sudan is in the news for all the wrong reasons – what people should know about is the locals’ pride in welcoming guests and the amazing things that can be seen around the country. In the north you’ll be treated to pyramids and other marvels of the ancient world, and odds are you’ll have them to yourself. And a falafel will cost less than US$1 and a bed for the night will be less than US$10.

HONDURAS

Bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) jumping out of Caribbean Sea at sunset.

If you’re looking for a scuba-diving destination where you can put your entire budget into going under, Honduras is the place to be. With sleeping budgets as low as US$10 a night and meals available for even less you can really stretch out the funds. Sitting pretty next door to the Caribbean Sea, you’ll have plenty of time to count your pennies as you sun yourself on the golden beaches. The developers haven’t invaded quite yet, but you’d better get in quick, before the good old days slip into the past. After snorkelling and kayaking around Roatan’s West Beach, splurge on a visit to the Unesco-listed ARCHEOLOGICAL PARK OF COPAN; entry is US$15.

MOROCCO


‘Want to buy a carpet? Come this way, my brother has a shop.’ Yeah, yeah, Morocco is all about the hard sell. But you won’t need much convincing to check it out. It’s overflowing with a distinctive culture and is a great place to see your dollars stretch – it’ll cost around US$40 a day to get by, but the beach and the markets are free. The more local you get, the cheaper it’ll be. From Europe it’s a short hop, so for many even the flight won’t cost that much. Travel between the main cities by (cheap) train.

JORDAN

Floating on the Dead Sea in Jordan. Extremely deep (averaging about 1000ft) the sea is the lowest body of water in the world.

Most people only know one destination in Jordan – PETRA. But what a destination to know. Made famous by the final sequence in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, it’s a Middle Eastern must-do. You don’t have to be an archaeologist to dig up the bargains: a bed for the night will run to a paltry US$5 and a meal will cost half that. It’s a seldom-visited pocket of the MIDDLE EAST and is easily combined with another cheapie destination, EGYPT. Just remember to bring your own fedora and bull whip. The necessary entry visas are issued at the Wadi Araba and Sheikh Hussein Bridge crossings; be aware that visas cannot be issued on arrival at the King Hussein Bridge.

LONELY PLANET

* dosta komentara na clanak... za i protiv. plus dodatna mjesta npr Bolivija wub.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Apr 7 2010, 08:38
Post #26


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Dangerous Vacations

Thrillcations for adrenaline junkies

By eTN Staff Writer | Apr 06, 2010


Image via 1watchmovie.com

"Not everyone's idea of the perfect vacation is lying on a beach and soaking in the sun," said Anne Banas, executive editor of SmarterTravel.com. "Some people want to experience nature in its most raw form, and we have pulled together some incredibly enticing vacations for even the most intense thrill seekers."

Today, the company announced its editors' picks of the top dangerous vacation spots. The destinations include places known for violent weather and the wrath of Mother Nature.

Tornado Chasing
Storm chasing tour companies dot the Tornado Belt of the midwestern United States, so there are plenty of deals to be had. Check out Tradd Storm Chasing Tours' 6 day/7 night excursion, which includes accommodations and ground transport.

Storm Watching
Crashing 30-foot waves, driving rain, and cold wind don't sound like much of a vacation, unless you're in Tofino, a small town on the west shore of Vancouver Island. The Mackenzie Beach Resort offers a great location from which to observe.

Lighting Up the Sky
Lightning is a very dangerous spectacle, but at The Lightning Field in New Mexico, you can witness its terrifying beauty up close and in relative safety. Cabin rentals adjoining the field are available for lightning bugs.

Brrrrr
Mt. Washington holds the all-time surface wind speed from a gust recorded at 231 miles per hour in 1931, and holds the world's "Worst Weather" title. EduTrips offers packages that include lodging, meals, transport, and classes.

Volcanoes
While not technically weather, volcanoes do rain down ash, and qualify as a way to glimpse nature's fury. The Caribbean island of Montserrat's Soufriere Hills offers volcano viewing tours from Antigua and includes the flight from Antigua, tour, and lunch.

e turbo news
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Apr 16 2010, 09:02
Post #27


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Switzerland Of The East Opens To Foreigners

100 Himalayan peaks open for foreign tourists for the first time


Image via britannica.com

NEW DELHI - India has for the first time opened nearly 100 high-altitude Himalayan peaks in India-controlled Kashmir, once dubbed the Switzerland of the east, for foreign tourists, local media quoted a tourism official as saying Saturday.

The move by the Indian government to allow foreign climbers follows a significant decline in violence by insurgent groups in the region since India and Pakistan started a peace process in 2004, PTI cited the Kashmiri tourism official Farooq Ahmed Shah, as saying.

"We are optimistic that the decision will give a big boost to tourism and attract more and more foreign tourists," he said.

The peaks to be opened for trekking and mountaineering are situated at an altitude ranging from 3,000 meters (9,842 feet) to 7,800 meters (25,590 feet), mostly in the Eastern Karakoram mountain range of Ladakh -- one of the three regions of the northern part of India-controlled Kashmir.

The Indian Defence Ministry, which had earlier expressed reservation on throwing open the peaks, has given its nod, according to Nawang Rigzin Jora, Kashmir's Tourism Minister.

About 60 percent of the revenues of Kashmir comes from tourism. The region was once called as mecca for climbers, skiers, honeymooners and film-makers.

eturbo news
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Apr 23 2010, 13:06
Post #28


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Cave tourism in Georgia threatens to destroy quiet way of life of orthodox monks



By Ivan Watson | Apr 22, 2010

Vardzia, Georgia - In an isolated mountain valley on the southern edge of the former Soviet Union stands a cliff honey-combed with caves.

This is Vardzia - a cave monastery built in the 12th century by Georgian kings and queens.

In the 800 years since its construction, Vardzia has been destroyed by an earthquake and further damaged by invading armies. In the final days of winter, when snow coats the surrounding peaks, the caves look all but deserted.

But Vardzia does have several permanent residents: seven Orthodox monks who have become the de-facto guardians of this ancient site.

They live much like their ancestors did, in spartan cave dwellings on the side of the cliff. They draw their water from a spring deep within the mountain that is only accessible via a series of tunnels. The well is called "Tamar's Tears," after Queen Tamar, who completed construction of Vardzia eight centuries ago after the death of her father King Giorgi.

One of the monks who lives in the cliff is Father Lazar. He roams the tunnels and staircases that hug the cliff-side, dressed in flowing black robes. Though he is only 28, his thick beard and pony-tail make him look far older.

"It puts joy in my heart to live here," the priest says, as he looks out of the doorway of his incense-scented cave at the rushing river below, where he sometimes fishes for trout. "In the winter this is a quiet place. The frost sets in and the trees die. It is a holy place. A spiritual place."

In fact, Father Lazar says aside from the monks, the only other people who live in this valley, are the nuns who inhabit a small convent beyond a bend in the river.

Speaking a mixture of Georgian, Russian and English, the monk takes visitors on a small tour of the complex, pointing out the remnants of an irrigation system that once provided water to up to 30,000 residents.

He also shows Vardzia's crown jewels: two cave chapels whose domed ceilings are hewn directly out of the rock. The domes are coated with ornate, icons, from the 8th century, depicting saints, Georgian royalty, and the dog-shaped demons that await the damned on Judgment Day.

In the summer, the monks endure a different kind of torment which disturbs their ascetic mountain life: tourists.

"For the priests, it is not very good because they make a lot of noise," Father Lazar says. "Different kinds of tourists come here, some of them yell a lot and run around here and there. They holler."

Vardzia has long been a tourist destination for hardy tourists willing to brave hours of driving down pot-holed mountain roads. But road crews are now re-paving the road - and there are big plans to further develop this quiet corner of Georgia.

"Visitors to Georgia are going to Vardzia and there is no infrastructure there at all," says Tengiz Bendukidze, an executive with Rakeen, an Emirati real estate development company. "That's why Rakeen is going to invest up to 20 million dollars. And we are going to build a 4-star hotel and villas also."

There are big hopes that through tourism, Georgia can overcome the chaos and conflict of nearly two decades of post-Soviet independence. In years gone by, this small Caucasus country was a prize destination, due to its unique combination of rich cuisine, ancient mountain-top monasteries, Black Sea coast line and full-throated polyphonic choral music.

"During the Soviet era, Georgia was the number one tourist attraction for almost all the Soviet Union," said Nika Gilauri, the prime minister of Georgia, in an interview with CNN. "We are getting back now this title for the region."

Executives at Rakeen say they are still working out the final concept of the new Vardzia hotel project.

"The main attraction is the caves. The cave city. And also we'll include [a] service package like hunting, rafting, camping and stuff like that," says Bendukidze.

The new hotel is expected to be constructed on a hillside directly across the river from the cave complex, on a patch of territory that was occupied by a Soviet-era hotel until it was demolished a few years ago.

Father Lazar has little positive to say about the old communist hotel...or its capitalist replacement.

"It's a bad idea to build a big hotel right there, directly across from Vardzia," he says. "If there's going to be a bar or a night club there, then that's also not good."

But, he concedes, the tourists will probably appreciate the view.

eturbo news
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Apr 28 2010, 10:48
Post #29


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Afghanistan Aims To Develop Tourism Industry

New tourist guest house opens in Afghan Panjshir province



Image via dvidshub.net

By 2nd Lt. Jason Smith | Apr 27, 2010
PANJSHIR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Panjshir province, Afghanistan, is known for its scenic terrain, fast-flowing river, permissive environment and mujahedeen resistance of both the Soviets and Taliban.

The provincial government is hoping to add tourism to the list of things people think about when pondering Panjshir.

In an April 26, ribbon-cutting ceremony, Bazarak Municipality Mayor Abdul Khabir, with help from Panjshir Deputy Gov. Abdul Rahman Kabiri; U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Curtis Velasquez, Provincial Reconstruction Team Panjshir commander; James DeHart, U.S. State Department and PRT Panjshir director; Elizabeth Smithwick, U.S. Agency for International Development field officer at PRT Panjshir; officially opened the newest guest house in the Panjshir province.

The guest house, which was funded by USAID, belongs to the municipality. Khabir's office is responsible for the day-to-day operations.

"It's for national and international guests of Panjshir," said Khabir through an interpreter. "The municipality will use the revenue to run the guest house."

The modern facility boasts 15 rooms with flat screen televisions. Eleven of the rooms are single beds, and four have two beds. The guest house also has a conference room.

"Having a guest house close to the provincial center provides a huge benefit by increasing provincial center capacity," said Velasquez, an Abilene, Kan., native. "People can come here to conduct business rather than staying somewhere far away or not coming at all. It enhances the ability to entertain government guests, thus increasing capacity of the provincial government."

The room price is a sliding scale from $20 to $100, depending on the room and reason for the stay. Government officials on government business will be at the lower end of the scale, while tourists can expect to pay a price near the higher end.

"This is the first municipality-run guest house in the country, and it's an opportunity to expand the services of the municipality by having available an attractive, clean and pleasant place to stay in the center of the provincial capital," said Smithwick, a Texas native. "It means individuals will no longer be tied to a limited schedule, but will be able to stay for extended periods of time. This means they will be able to meet with a greater number of government officials to help meet the needs of the Panjshir people."

Smithwick said the Panjshir Municipality Guest House, which was funded through the Afghan Municipality Strengthening Program, will be open to everyone, but is primarily intended for government business.

"We finally have a place for outside guests to stay that's closer than the Astana Guest House," said Khabir. It will certainly help the province, which is one of the most visited places for tourists in Afghanistan, added Khabir.

Following the ribbon cutting, special guests received a tour of the facility and met in the conference room for tea and snacks.

The guest house is now open for business. Tourists hoping to travel to Afghanistan should book rooms soon as space is limited, and Khabir expects to be very busy.

e turbo news

inace Panjshir dolina izgleda jebeno tj ovako:



wikipedia

This post has been edited by eYe-reEs: Apr 28 2010, 10:50
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Apr 28 2010, 12:09
Post #30


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



10 best places to experience music

1. Grand Ole Opry, USA



This country-music phenomenon is actually a Saturday night, live radio broadcast that goes out on Nashville’s WSM station. It’s been around since 1925, making it the USA’s longest continuous radio show, and takes place at Nashville’s 4400-seat Grand Ole Opry House. Each year thousands of good-ole boys and girls from around the globe git on down to Tennessee to get a load of the legendary show that has played host to numerous country music legends – Waylon Jennings, Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash – and others, like Keith Urban. Plan your trip at www.opry.com; tickets range from around US$70–400.

2. Berlin cabaret, Germany



For many people the words ’decadent’, ‘cabaret’ and ‘Berlin’ go together like ‘oil’, ‘terror’ and ‘war’. German cabaret began in the ’20s and was a lot darker than its sultry French equivalent – more satirical, more political, a reflection of the horrors of warfare. Today, although the scene just isn’t what it used to be, Berliner cabaret still offers something of that edge (along with leggy, high-kicking girls, of course), as well as the giddy thrill of being transported back to a time when art actually mattered. The Kit Kat Club is postmodern cabaret for sexual adventurers; open Friday, Saturday and Sunday, with Friday nights the best for genuine fetishists.

3. Havana, Cuba



The absorbing documentary Buena Vista Social Club (1999) implanted Cuban music (specifically, the pre-revolutionary son style) into the global consciousness, and today many pilgrims travel to Havana to experience son’s evocation of a time before Castro, before collectivisation, before poverty and isolation. They say son is connected to the hips (it’s a prototype of salsa), but that’s not all you can hear in Havana’s bars and streets: rumba, salsa (of course) and Latin jazz will also shake your hips silly. The Salon Rosada in Marianao lets you listen to unreal Saturday night tunes from a balcony overlooking a sea of dancers; entry is US$10 for non-Cubans or US$0.25 for locals.

4. Carling Weekend, Reading, England



With a few decades of music history under its belt, the Reading festival is a worthy pilgrimage for fans of alternative pop, rock, rap and hiphop. The three-day event can feel like a home away from home (if your home has 10-million-watt speakers). Once your campsite is set up, head to a stage (there are six) and lose your mind with 60,000 other people. If an act doesn’t measure up, contribute to a barrage of empty plastic bottles, a festival tradition. If you love the act, follow it to Leeds the next day, where a sister festival is held concurrently. Tickets usually go on sale in March; standard day passes cost around £70; swat the line up at www.readingfestival.com and www.leedsmusicfestival.com.

5. Ibiza, Spain

Mention the words ‘Ibiza’ and ‘dance music’ these days and you might get a another word: ‘dated’. But this small island off Spain’s eastern coast is pretty much where it all began. In the late ’80s British DJs would play at Ibiza’s Ecstasy-fuelled clubs before importing the hedonistic vibe back to England, where house music and techno were taking off ; the rest is history. Ibizan clubs are a lot more commercial now, and there’s a hell of a lot more lager louts to contend with, but the atmosphere is still undeniably riotous, self-indulgent and pleasure seeking. Privilege is the world’s ‘massivist’ club; it’s 4km from Ibiza Town but offers a free bus shuttle departing every 30 minutes (midnight–6am) from Ibiza harbour.

6. New Orleans Jazz Festival, USA



Also known as ‘Jazz Fest’, this 10-day gala event spread across 12 stages attracts 650,000 people per year and pretty much defines the spirit and heritage of New Orleans. It’s eclectic, featuring gospel, funk, zydeco, rock and Caribbean in addition to jazz, but the best endorsement is the stellar roster of acts it has staged, including Fats Domino, Dr John, Allen Toussaint, Aretha Franklin, Miles Davis, Bob Dylan, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Santana, Sarah Vaughan, Paul Simon, BB King, Joni Mitchell, James Brown, Willie Nelson, The Temptations, Van Morrison, LL Cool J, Gladys Knight and Youssou N’Dour. Standard one-day tickets are US$50 at the gate (US$40 if booked online), with more pricey VIP options available; check listings and options at www.nojazzfest.com.

7. Dakar, Senegal



They say Dakar is the Paris of French West Africa, a cultural hub with intellectuals and artists aplenty. Fittingly, it has a throbbing live-music scene, powered by mbalax, a cross-hatching of Latin and Caribbean music with African>
drumming. Beloved Senegalese musician Youssou N’Dour is the most famous exponent of mbalax, but there are others who have followed his lead, including Baaba Maal and Cheikh Lo. Mbalax performances are addictive: the sight of a 10-piece band completely absorbed in the music while delirious punters stuff cash into the musicians’ mouths and pockets is one not easily forgotten. Local and international legend Seck hosts live mbalax nights at the Kilimanjaro club, next to the Soumbédioune fish market.

8. Vienna, Austria



Strauss, Schubert, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Schönberg and Mahler… These giants of classical music all at some stage lived or made music in Vienna, and their legacy is celebrated in the city with an annual performance season lasting from September to June, plus an additional nine festivals per year, special events and one-off performances. For lovers of classical music, what could be finer than experiencing a world-class recital by the Vienna Philharmonic in the stately Wiener Konzerthaus – in the city where it all began? The Wiener Konzerthaus is a short stroll from the U4 Stadtpark Station. Public transport is free with a valid concert ticket for two hours prior to a performance.

9. London, England



Many come to London for the music, whether they want to party hard in a superclub like Ministry or Fabric; chill to an adventurous, possibly stoned DJ in some too-cool-for-school bar; or head to one of London’s unbeatable live-music venues (anyone who’s anyone plays the capital at some stage). Think of the scenes that London has incubated, like punk, rave and drum and bass, and the many ultrafamous London musos like Bowie, the Stones, the Clash, the Pistols… Punk started here, and continues to live here; get the latest gig listings at www.eroding.org.uk.

10. Austin, Texas, USA



Texas dubs itself the ‘Live Music Capital of the World’, which is a bit cheeky considering the claims of other cities like London. How many famous bands from Austin can you name off the top of your head? Now how many can you think of from London? Alright, calm down – let’s not get into one of these kind of fights. Let’s just agree that live music is terribly important to Austin, and respect the fact that it has more live-music venues per capita than Nashville, Las Vegas, New York City, Memphis or Los Angeles. Get the Austin groove online at www.unlockaustin.com, which features news and reviews of the city’s live-music talent and venues.

Lonely Planet
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Apr 29 2010, 10:47
Post #31


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



One World Trekking unveils new Nepal hike



28 Apr 10 (TravMedia.com): The Mount Everest region of Nepal is undeniably the most the popular and well-trodden trekking destination in the Himalaya and with good reason, who wouldn’t want to see the world’s tallest mountain?

One World Trekking’s new Khumbu Explorer Trek in Nepal invites avid hikers to explore a path less traveled through this famous and culturally rich ‘Land of the Sherpa’. In November 2009, trekking guides Manasseh Franklin and Andy Crisconi traveled to Nepal to research a new 10-day cultural trek, exploring the lesser known and spectacular high route between the villages of Tengboche and Khumjung, visiting the traditional Sherpa hamlets of Upper Pengboche, Phortse and Thame and admiring the ancient monasteries of Thame and Upper Pengboche. Along the way you will wander through fairytale rhododendron forest and may spot wildlife such as the Himalayan tahr, barking deer, musk deer and the bearded mountain goat which, seeming to be an elk with a lion’s mane, may belong in Harry Potter’s Forbidden Forest! Climbing from the village of Pengboche, this less-traveled Everest trekking route allows us to stay up high while connecting a series of ridges between Upper Pengboche, Phortse and Khumjung in Nepal’s Green Valley (http://oneworldtrekking.wordpress.com/). From peaceful vantage points we can gaze down on the famous Tengboche Monastery along the Dudh Kosi River and upward into the awesome outstretched arms of Ama Dablam, Mother’s Charm; Nepal’s most beautiful peak which dominates the landscape of this most stunning and gravity defying land.

One World Trekking (http://www.oneworldtrekking.com) arranges this as a fully-supported, easily paced lodge trek that allows the Nepal traveler to soak up the beauty of the Home of Mount Everest. Our Khumbu Explorer Trek is a quieter, lower altitude alternative to the traditional Everest Base Camp route and one that is sure to satisfy the cultural explorer and mountain enthusiast alike.

For more information on this great short trek in 'The Land of Mount Everest', please email us at info(at)oneworldtrekking(dot)com or visit our website at http://www.OneWorldTrekking.com. Visit us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/oneworldtrekking

travel daily asia

********************************************************************************
***********

Trekking In Nepal: Trekking in the Summer Months And During The Christmas And New Years Holidays



There are two major factors to consider when deciding to trek in Nepal: crowds and weather. As a general rule, the better the weather, the more people you will be joining you on the trails. During the high tourist seasons in the spring and fall, areas such as Everest and Annapurna can get downright busy.

Trekking in Nepal is possible at any time of year depending on where you are going. With each season comes an opportunity to explore the various regions in Nepal on foot. During the summer monsoon season (June – August), you can trek in the rain shadow areas on the north side of the Himalayas in areas such as Mustang, Upper Manang (Annapurna and NarPhu region) and Dolpo. These mountainous and culturally spectacular regions are blocked from the rain clouds due to the surrounding high mountains and are little-effected by the influence of the monsoon weather patterns. The best part about trekking in these areas in the summer is that the trekking routes are less crowded.

The winter in Nepal (December – February) is also a fine time for lodge trekking. This period is typically defined by long stretches of high pressure, blue skies and, yes, very cold mornings and evenings. But, you will be spending your nights in the various lodges en route which provide a relatively warm and comfortable rooms and a variety of healthy food choices.

The high passes of the Everest and Annapurna areas are usually closed by snow from late November to early March, so trekking to the Annapurna Sanctuary, Ghorepani & Poon Hill and the lowers regions of the Khumbu (Everest region) are your best options as they travel up to moderate elevations and do not require the crossing of a high mountain pass. The month of February is still cold, though less so as the spring trekking season of March and April is approaching.

So, for the school teachers out there with only summer off, those wishing to escape the craziness of the holiday season or if you just want to miss the crowded trails, Nepal is still an option for your hiking vacation.

one world trekking - world press
http://oneworldtrekking.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ovoiono
post Apr 29 2010, 20:14
Post #32


Posting Freak
******

Group: Memberz
Posts: 479
Joined: 12-February 10
Member No.: 13,693



[quote name='eYe-reEs' date='Apr 29 2010, 11:47' post='119536']
odlične reportaže; vrhunske,maštovite fotografije na flickr galeriji. klap.gif star.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post Apr 30 2010, 09:13
Post #33


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



thnx!!! ovo je tek 1 mali dio svega. chirni opet za 20ak dana cool.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ovoiono
post Apr 30 2010, 18:46
Post #34


Posting Freak
******

Group: Memberz
Posts: 479
Joined: 12-February 10
Member No.: 13,693



QUOTE (eYe-reEs @ Apr 30 2010, 10:13) *
thnx!!! ovo je tek 1 mali dio svega. chirni opet za 20ak dana cool.gif

vit pležr cool.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post May 5 2010, 10:59
Post #35


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



How to avoid inflated travel bill

Avoiding 10 worst travel rip-offs

By Sarah Pascarella | May 02, 2010


We've all dealt with the unpleasant experience of an inflated travel bill, whether it's getting socked with extra fees at the airport or discovering fine-print charges for a hotel room. Being an active and aware consumer, however, can protect you—and your wallet. Read on to discover the 10 worst travel rip-offs currently plaguing the industry, and how you can avoid them.

1. Carry-On Bag Fees

A few weeks ago, Spirit announced it would begin charging for carry-on bags, to the tune of up to $45 per bag. Since then, the industry has been in an uproar, with five other airlines pledging not to add similar fees on their respective flights. The pushback is obvious—not all travelers take baggage, but most travelers have at least one carry-on. Add a price tag to the carry-on and you challenge even the lightest of travelers.

As for the argument that charging for a carry-on will reduce boarding and deplaning times, well, it remains to be seen if this new fee will result in increased efficiency at the airport. To me, it just sounds like creative justification for hitting travelers with a new (and nearly unavoidable) fee.

To avoid a carry-on bag fee, the strategy is simple: Don't fly Spirit.

2. All Other Baggage Fees

While we're on the topic of bags, let's consider the relatively new development of airlines charging for checked bags. American was the first carrier to do so in May 2008, and many carriers quickly followed suit. What started off as a seemingly bad idea (for customers, natch, not the airlines) unfortunately turned into an industry standard. Two years later, there remain just two lonely standouts that don't charge customers for their baggage: Southwest (two checked bags free) and JetBlue (one checked bag free).

Why are baggage fees a rip-off? Simply put, the act of traveling typically necessitates a bag. Of course, you can be creative and try to pack as light as possible, but for most people, taking a trip longer than two days will require a suitcase. Given that the fees aren't insignificant (ranging from $15 to $45 for the first checked bag), the extra charges for such basics can really add up.

To avoid paying for bags, you could limit your air travel to Southwest and JetBlue, or you could strive to travel light and only pack carry-on bags when using other airlines. You could also investigate the cost of shipping your belongings ahead to your destination, as well as back home, a few days before your departure and return.

3. In-Person vs. Online Fees

This pricing discrepancy in the airline industry is downright sneaky. For example, check a bag with Continental, Delta, or United at the airport and it'll cost you $25. Do so online, though, and it's slightly cheaper—$23. US Airways charges $25 for an in-person baggage check or $20 to check a bag online. The airlines are passing on their costs of having to employ customer service reps, baggage personnel, and the like to you, the customer. Use those employees and their services by checking a bag at the airport and it'll cost you. This difference in fee pricing is discriminatory to those without Internet access, as such customers are penalized in the pocketbook simply because they're not online.

The best strategy is to use the Web as your default for all travel purchases. If you're skittish about booking online, plan on putting in a good amount of preliminary research to ensure you won't be penalized by booking in person or over the phone.

4. Fees to Choose Your Coach Seat in Advance


SmarterTravel columnist Ed Perkins considers full-fare coach/economy class seating a big rip-off, as you're paying "top dollar for a lousy product." Now, let's add insult to injury—extra charges to choose that lousy coach seat in advance. Currently, coach seat selection fees are in place with AirTran, Spirit, and Virgin America.

With most other airlines, you can choose your seats in advance without paying extra on your final ticket cost. And why not? This is what you're purchasing. I can think of few other industries where picking out your exact product results in a surcharge. It's like an extra fee for test driving a car, or one for handling which apples you choose to purchase from the supermarket. In other words, a rip-off.

If you don't mind a random seat assignment, forego choosing your seat in advance with AirTran, Spirit, and Virgin America to avoid the fee. Or, conversely, avoid these fees altogether by choosing competitor airlines.

5. Charges for Pillows, Blankets, and Headphones In-Flight

Here we have another case of the airlines charging for items that used to be included in the price of your ticket. Nowadays, with "unbundling" being all the rage, you can expect to pay up to $12 for a kit including a small pillow, blanket, and earplugs, and a buck or two for headsets. Essentially, the charges here are born of convenience—you're paying because you're in the right spot at the right time. Truly, can you think of any other scenario in which you would shell out up to $12 for what is essentially a square of fleece and a static-cling pillow? You're better off packing your carry-on bag wisely and including your own fleece, pashmina or scarf, sleep mask, and pillow—you'll get higher-quality products and a more restful experience.

6. Fees to Redeem Your Frequent Flyer Miles

Accrued miles on US Airways? Try to book a flight using your frequent flyer miles and you'll be charged anywhere from $25 to $50 just to redeem your "reward." This extra fee negates the "free" element of reward travel—you've upheld your end of the bargain by being loyal to your airline, but when you ask the company to uphold its promise of a free flight for your efforts, you get slammed with a surcharge. If it sounds unfair, that's because it is.

While most other airlines will let you book award travel for free online, try to do so in person or over the phone and it becomes a different story. A whopping 11 domestic airlines charge frequent flyer redemption fees for non-online transactions, and the penalties range from $15 to $40.

Bottom line? If you're going to book award travel, do so online—and if you're traveling with US Airways, consider switching your loyalty program to a different carrier.

7. CDW/LDW Insurance for Rental Cars

The collision-damage and loss-damage waiver insurance on rental cars may not be necessary. In many situations, your own insurance provider and credit card offer similar protections in the case of damage or theft. Contact your car insurance and credit card companies to determine your current coverage. Once you've determined that you have the insurance you need, you can decline these extra charges with confidence that you're not paying twice for the same services.

8. Bank Surcharges on Foreign Credit Card Transactions

There are many rip-off fees associated with credit card use nowadays, but among the worst may be surcharges for purchases/exchanges on foreign soil. The 2 percent fee is small, but it's a fee for doing absolutely nothing. The best way to work around this gouge is to limit the times you use your card while overseas. Make fewer credit card purchases, and consider cash instead. ATM debit cards often have better exchange rates and minimal fees—just make sure you safeguard your currency if employing this method.

9. Add-On Fees That Should Be Factored in the Base Price

Add-on fees are the ones that most commonly get you by surprise—common-sense items or services that you thought you were already paying for when you booked. These add-on fees can include daily "resort" or "housekeeping" costs at hotels, licensing or other usage-related surcharges on rental cars, and (perhaps the worst of all) fees just to make a transaction in the first place. To avoid unpleasant surprises such as these, be sure to read all fine print up front before you book. Check the travel provider in question on user-review sites and consumer-protection agencies (such as the Better Business Bureau). If you can avoid these companies entirely, then you won't be subject to their rip-off fees.

10. Hotel Wi-Fi Charges

Nowadays, many consider the Internet to be a utility, as essential to your hotel stay as running water and electricity. Indeed, many hotels have recognized this and include high-speed wireless Internet access in the guest room rate. Not all do, however, and without reading the fine print, you might pay up to $14.95 per day for the privilege of using the Internet in your hotel room. Others may offer free Internet access only in public areas, and you'll get charged if you log on in your room. If you're a frequent business traveler or just like to stay connected during your vacation, call and ask the front desk clerk if there are fees to use the Internet. If so, you might want to consider taking your business elsewhere.

e turbo news
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post May 5 2010, 11:06
Post #36


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Myanmar Introduces Visas On Arrival

Myanmar to offer tourist visas on arrival



Omage via flickr.com

May 04, 2010

Myanmar's military government will offer visas on arrival to boost the country's nascent tourism sector, a travel industry official said on Tuesday.

Tourist visas, which are normally arranged days in advance at an embassy abroad, will be now be available at international airports in Mandalay and the biggest city, Yangon, said Tin Tun Aung, secretary of the Myanmar Travel Entrepreneurs Association.

"We heartily welcome it," Tin Tun Aung said. "I'm sure it will have a strong impact on tourist arrivals to our country."

The cost of the visa will be $30 and would be valid for 28 days, he added.

Although Myanmar is rich in jungles, beaches and mountains and is dotted with hundreds of golden Buddhist temples, its tourism industry remains largely undeveloped.

Total tourist arrivals in Myanmar during for the fiscal year 2009-2010 stood at 300,000, compared with 255,288 for the same period a year earlier. Some 315,536 people traveled to Myanmar in the 2005-2006 period, official data showed.

Those figures are dwarfed by neighboring Thailand, which drew 14.1 million tourists last year.

Many potential visitors are deterred by the poor reputation of the country and its hardline military rulers, who are accused of corruption, stifling democrat

Myanmar's government plans to hold its first election in two decades some time this year and is on a drive to privatize numerous industries, including shipping and air travel, to attract more foreign investment, which has been restricted by Western sanctions on the regime.

ic freedoms and presiding over decades of human rights abuses.

e turbo news

This post has been edited by eYe-reEs: May 5 2010, 11:06
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post May 6 2010, 11:51
Post #37


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Libya seeks to attract tourists

Libya to ease visa restrictions for foreign tourists


Image via sukra-travel.com

By Alaa Shahine | May 05, 2010

Libya plans to ease visa restrictions for many countries as it seeks to attract tourists and diversify its economy away from oil, said Saif al-Islam al-Qaddafi, the son of Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi.

“Right now it is very difficult to get a visa,” Qaddafi said in an address at the American University in Cairo today. “But soon, very, very soon, it will be very easy for many people around the world to visit Libya.”

The North African state in March lifted a temporary visa ban on visitors from 25 European countries that was imposed during a dispute with Switzerland, sparked by the July 2008 arrest of Qaddafi’s other son Hannibal on charges he mistreated two servants. He was released on bail, though Libya detained two Swiss businessmen. In February, one of the businessmen was freed, while Max Goeldi of ABB Ltd., the world’s biggest builder of power grids, remains in custody.

Saif al-Islam said that attracting more tourists was a way to improve the image of his country, tarnished in the 1980s and 1990s by accusations from the U.S. that it sponsored terrorism and was attempting to develop nuclear weapons.

“If we get millions of tourists to go to Libya they can see with their own eyes, so they can be good witnesses for you and for us,” Saif al-Islam said. Libya has numerous Greek and Roman ruins at sites such as Leptis Magna and Sabratha.

Isolation

The country began to emerge from decades of international isolation in 2002 when the elder Qaddafi abandoned a nuclear- arms development effort, pledged to destroy stockpiles of chemical weapons and renounced terrorism.

International oil companies were drawn to Libya after international sanctions were lifted. The country must now reduce its dependence on the oil industry, enabling Libya to move from an “artificial economy” to a real one, Saif al-Islam said. Oil revenue makes up more than 70 percent of gross domestic product.

A rising number of foreign investors have been attracted to Libya’s non-oil industries in recent years. BNP Paribas of France owns 19 percent of Sahara Bank in Libya and the Arab Bank of Jordan has a similar stake in Wahda Bank.

Six lenders including HSBC Holding PLC and Standard Chartered PLC were short-listed for two banking licenses in Libya. The central bank has said that it will announce the winners in July.

e turbo news
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post May 7 2010, 10:51
Post #38


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



New Service
Flydubai to begin flights to Afghan capital of Kabul


Image via capitaleritrea.com

By eTN Staff Writer | May 03, 2010

Beginning May 17, flydubai will begin flights between Dubai and the Afghan capital of Kabul. Flydubai is owned by the government of Dubai and was established to offer quality, low-cost travel to destinations that are underserved by direct air links to the UAE or where additional capacity is required.

Ghaith Al Ghaith, CEO of flydubai said: "We are very excited about the start of our new service to Kabul. There are currently more than 1,000 people traveling between Dubai and Kabul every day, and we are pleased to offer them the option of traveling on one of the industry's safest, newest fleets of aircraft.

"We believe there will be a huge demand for flydubai, and as this is an important market for us; we are already working with the authorities to increase the number of flights we operate to the city. Kabul is a fascinating place with an incredible history. I am personally looking forward to making the trip in the near future."

Following its first commercial flight in June 2009, flydubai has rapidly grown its network to comprise 13 operational destinations, with an additional five routes scheduled to begin operating by the end of June.

Sticking to the traditional low-cost model, flydubai's fares are one way, tax inclusive, and include one piece of hand luggage. The other services you would find on a full-service airline are also available but are charged separately.
"This is how we make our fares fair," said Al Ghaith. "After all why should you pay for a suitcase if you are traveling with hand luggage? And why should you pay for a meal if you don't want to eat?"

Although flydubai is low cost, the airline has spent money where it counts. In 2008, flydubai ordered 50 brand new 737-800 Next Generation aircraft from Boeing at a list price of US$4 billion. The 737-800NG is one of the safest aircraft flying today and, with one taking off every 4.6 seconds somewhere in the world and a 40-year track record, there is plenty of evidence to back up that claim.

Flydubai didn't scrimp onboard either, with seats specially designed by Recaro - seat manufacturer for Formula 1 and Porsche - to give extra comfort and legroom. A simple redesign, which moved the traditional seat back pocket to up behind the tray, gives each seat an additional 2 inches of extra legroom, and means flydubai has one of the largest seat pitches of any economy airline.

"We may be a low-cost airline, but low cost doesn't have to mean low quality," explained Al Ghaith. "We are committed to upholding the very highest standards of safety and comfort onboard, and we want to ensure our passengers enjoy their reliable, on-time flight with flydubai. We are different [from] other airlines operating on the Kabul-Dubai route, so I would encourage people to give us a try and find out why we have become one of the world's fastest-growing, start-up airlines ever."

e turbo news


Dubai To Pakistan
Rapid expansion of flydubai continues with flights to Karachi


Image via jamiebriant.org

By eTN Staff Writer | May 05, 2010

Flydubai announced today that it has added Karachi, Pakistan, as the newest route in its fast-growing network. This is the sixth new flight announcement within the past month. The low-cost airline now has 19 destinations on its air service schedule.

Pakistan is home to many of the expatriate workers in the UAE (United Arab Emirates), and the low-cost flights to Karachi, popularly referred to as the City of Lights, will provide an excellent opportunity to make the return trip to see friends and family more often. Flydubai will operate daily flights to the South Asian city of Pakistan from June 21.

Karachi houses the country's largest commercial corporations and is the center of financial, industry, and trade sectors. The opportunity for less complicated, less stressful, and less expensive business travel is also expected to create a large demand.

Ghaith Al Ghaith, CEO of flydubai, said Karachi would play an important role in expanding flydubai's reach and will make a significant difference to the Pakistani expatriates working in the UAE.

"There are currently more than 700,000 expatriates from Pakistan working in the UAE and an extra opportunity for them to travel back home has to be good news. We are in the business of bringing more people together more often, and we can see the Karachi route being a very busy one indeed," he said.

"Pakistan is already a very close trading partner with the UAE, and there is always the potential for even more commercial ties. One of our goals is to use the flydubai routes as a means for people to forge new friendships, visit new places and new cultures, to experience new destinations, and to enjoy new relationships, whether for business or pleasure," Al Ghaith added.

The UAE is also Pakistan's biggest source of foreign remittance through banking channels. The bilateral trade between the two countries was around US$6 billion (Dh22.04 billion) in 2009, making the UAE the second largest trade partner of Pakistan.

FZ333 will depart Dubai from Sunday to Thursday at 0815 hours and arrive in Karachi at 1125 hours. The return flight, FZ334, will leave at 1210 hours arriving in Dubai at 1320 hours local time. On Fridays and Saturdays, FZ333 will depart Dubai at 1135 hours and arrive in Karachi at 1445 hours. The return flight, FZ334, will leave at 1530 hours and arrive in Dubai at 1640 hours local time.

Flydubai's operational destinations are Beirut-Lebanon, Amman-Jordan, Damascus and Aleppo-Syria, Alexandria-Egypt and Djibouti-Africa, Doha-Qatar, Baku-Azerbaijan, Khartoum-Sudan, Bahrain, Kathmandu-Nepal, Muscat-Oman, and Kuwait. The airline will soon start service to Assiut and Luxor-Egypt, Istanbul-Turkey, Kabul-Afghanistan, and Latakia-Syria.

The flydubai model is simple, with customers paying only for the services they want to receive. The ticket price includes all taxes and one piece of hand baggage, weighing up to 10 kg, per passenger.

Passengers have the option to purchase checked-in baggage in advance, subject to availability. Checked baggage at the airport is also strictly subject to availability and passengers are advised to book online early to secure the space, as only pre-purchased baggage can be guaranteed.

Nominal payments allows customers to select their seat and secure extra legroom positions. Bookings can be changed for a small fee, plus any difference in the fare, and food and drink can be purchased on board.

Flydubai operates from a modernized and enhanced Terminal 2 on the north side of Dubai International Airport.

e turbo news

flydubai
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post May 12 2010, 12:24
Post #39


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Skyscanner flight trends April 2010: Top 50 flight destinations

April 2010 has been an interesting month for the UK travel sector which has experienced a five day closure of airspace, a first in aviation history; a month of unsettled weather, with everything from snow storms to heat waves, and some of the UK’s favourite holiday destinations, Greece and Thailand, were hit by civil unrest.

Cheap flight comparison site Skyscanner reveals how the events of April 2010 affected the UK’s interest in travel destinations.

The top five remain stable with the immensely popular beach destinations of Malaga, Alicante, Tenerife, Palma and Faro holding on to their positions. Dalaman continues its popularity spurt, moving up one more place to number six, overtaking London. Dublin also rose one spot, displacing New York, whilst Amsterdam held firm at number ten.



Highest Climbers
Gerona was the highest climber this month, rising nine places in popularity, followed by Luqa in Malta and Pisa which both rose eight places. Stockholm and Bodrum both moved up seven spots, as did Nice, likely due to the Cannes Film festival which takes place in May.

Biggest Fallers
Geneva took by far the biggest drop this month, slipping a massive twenty places in the charts, likely due to the end of the ski season. Dubai fell nine places and Lanzarote slipped six spots down to nineteen.

New Entries
Germany has fared well this month with both Hamburg and Frankfurt entering the Top 50. Greece will be reassured to see Crete enter the charts despite its well publicised economic problems, and rival Turkey will be pleased that Antalya has also entered, meaning that overall Turkey has four locations in the Top 50, to Greece’s two.

Drop Outs
After rocketing up the charts last month, Munich disappears from the Top 50 this month, along with Manchester, Hong Kong and Budapest.

Barry Smith, Skyscanner Co-Founder and Development Director commented: “Spain continues to hold on to the top spots along with Portugal’s Faro. Dalaman is going from strength to strength, rising another place from last month, and despite civil unrest in Thailand, Bangkok has risen two places to number 11, showing its resilience as a tourist destination.”

April 2010 Top 50 Destinations
1. Malaga (Spain) [0]
2. Alicante (Spain) [0]
3. Tenerife (Spain) [0]
4. Palma (Spain) [0]
5. Faro (Portugal) [0]
6. Dalaman (Turkey) [+1]
7. London (UK) [-1]
8. Dublin (Ireland) [+1]
9. New York (USA) [-1]
10. Amsterdam (Netherlands) [0]
11. Bangkok (Thailand) [+2]
12. Barcelona (Spain) [-1]
13. Paphos (Cyprus) [+1]
14. Ibiza (Spain) [+5]
15. Orlando Florida (USA) [+5]
16. Larnaca (Cyprus) [+1]
17. Paris (France) [-1]
18. Lanzarote (Spain) [-6]
19. Bodrum (Turkey) [+7]
20. Belfast (UK) [-2]
21. Rome (Italy) [+1]
22. Murcia (Spain) [+1]
23. Madrid (Spain) [+1]
24. Edinburgh (UK) [-3]
25. Glasgow (UK) [+3]
26. Gran Canaria (Spain) [+1]
27. Milan (Italy) [-2]
28. Prague (Czech Republic) [+4]
29. Berlin (German) [+1]
30. Gerona (Spain) [+9]
31. Nice (France) [+7]
32. Luqa (Malta) [+8]
33. Athens (Greece) [+4]
34. Sharm El Sheikh (Egypt) [-5]
35. Geneva (Switzerland) [-20]
36. Venice (Italy) [-5]
37. Hamburg (Germany) [NEW ENTRY]
38. Istanbul (Turkey) [-4]
39. Lisbon (Portugal) [-3]
40. Marrakech Menara (Morocco) [+1]
41. Stockholm (Sweden) [+7]
42. Pisa (Italy) [+8]
43. Crete (Greece) [NEW ENTRY]
44. Dubai (UAE) [-9]
45. Krakow (Poland) [-2]
46. Frankfurt (Germany) [NEW ENTRY]
47. Fuerteventura (Spain) [-5]
48. Sydney (Australia) [-3]
49. Antalya (Turkey) [NEW ENTRY]
50. Los Angeles (USA) [-1]

Rankings are based on the number of searches for flights during April 2010 on the Skyscanner website for UK departures. Ranking movement is based on change compared to March 2010 Trends skyscanner.net

travel daily news
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
eYe-reEs
post May 25 2010, 15:06
Post #40


Regular Member
*********

Group: Senior Members
Posts: 6,079
Joined: 12-September 02
Member No.: 19



Wizz Air launches flights from London Luton to Split and Dubrovnik

Wizz Air will markedly expand its presence in Croatia with the launch of cheap flights to Split and Dubrovnik from London Luton this summer. The low-cost airline will also launch flights to Venice Treviso, bringing its total number of routes from London Luton to 20.

Currently Wizz Air offers flights to Croatian capital Zagreb, and to Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia, Serbia and Ukraine.

Four weekly flights to Split (Mon, Wed, Fri, Sun) will commence on June 18th, while three weekly flights to Dubrovnik (Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday) will start on June 19 th.

Tickets are already on sale http://wizzair.com with fares starting from as low as GBP 41.99 one way, including taxes and charges.

croatia exclusive
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

4 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: August 01, 2021 06:32